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President of Taiwan Receives Domestic Vaccine Developed by Taiwan; Check Details

President of Taiwan Receives Domestic Vaccine Developed by Taiwan; Check Details

Tsai Ing-wen, the president of Taiwan, gets her first injection of coronavirus vaccine. In July, officials granted emergency approval to the two-dose Medigen protein subunit vaccine. According to critics, the decision sparked outrage within Taiwan’s medical and scientific communities. Only about 700,000 doses of the vaccines Taiwan had purchased had arrived. It was, however, able to get approximately 5 million vaccines, which were supplied by Japan and the United States.

Key Highlights

  • In July, officials granted emergency approval to the two-dose Medigen protein subunit vaccine.
  • The decision sparked outrage within Taiwan’s medical and scientific communities.
  • Only about 700,000 doses of the vaccines Taiwan had purchased had arrived.
  • It was, however, able to get approximately 5 million vaccines, which were supplied by Japan and the United States.
  • 40% of Taiwan’s 23 million people have received at least one dosage of the COVID-19 vaccination, according to the island’S vaccination program.

On Monday, Taiwanese President Tsai Ing-wen received the first dose of the island’s locally developed coronavirus vaccine, kicking off its public deployment.

The Medigen Vaccine Biologics Corp. vaccine was given emergency approval by regulators in July, bypassing a process that sparked outrage among Taiwan’s medical and scientific communities.

Taiwanese regulators skipped through the large-scale, longer-term investigations that are usually required for vaccination approval. Instead, they compared the level of antibodies produced by Medigen’s vaccination to that of AstraZeneca’s vaccine, which has been approved by a number of nations and has gone through all three stages of clinical trials.

A portion of the coronavirus is used in the two-dose Medigen protein subunit vaccine to instruct the body to build an immune response.

An expert from the vaccination advisory council resigned as a result of the decision to award approval based on the new criterion.

Critics argue that obtaining clearance before full clinical trials are completed does not provide enough information on how effective the vaccine is in the real world at protecting against COVID-19, despite encouraging preliminary results.

Scientists know that the level of antibodies in the blood correlates with disease protection, but they don’t know what that number is.

Medigen will be required to present real-world efficacy data within a year after receiving permission, according to regulators. They approved the vaccination after Medigen supplied evidence showing that it produced 3.4 times the level of neutralizing antibodies as AstraZeneca’s vaccine.

Tsai took her first dosage of the vaccine in a gymnasium at National Taiwan University in Taipei on Monday morning. She checked in for her appointment, like other patients, by inserting her national health insurance card into the computer system.

She made an OK sign with her hand after a nurse gave her the shot.

As of last Friday, 40% of Taiwan’s 23 million people have received at least one dosage of the COVID-19 vaccination. The island’s vaccination program prioritizes first shots, with only the most at-risk groups, such as medical personnel, receiving the full two doses at first.

That’s a significant increase from May, when only about 5% of the population had received the vaccine.

During the pandemic, Taiwan remained largely COVID-19-free for a year and a half, until an epidemic caused by the alpha variant spread over the island in May, necessitating a large-scale lockdown.

Taiwan had only gotten roughly 700,000 doses of the vaccines it had purchased at the time. It was, however, able to get approximately 5 million vaccines, which were supplied by Japan and the US.

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