Home India To combat currency and brand counterfeiting, Indian scientists develop nanomaterials-based security ink

To combat currency and brand counterfeiting, Indian scientists develop nanomaterials-based security ink

To combat currency and brand counterfeiting, Indian scientists develop nanomaterials-based security ink

Non-toxic nanomaterial security ink has been produced by Indian scientists that emits light on its own. Counterfeiters commonly utilize covert tags made of luminescent ink. Because fluorides are less stable and poisonous, most security inks on the market now use them. Luminescent security ink produced by the researcher utilizes nanomaterials doped with Gd1-xBixPO4 and doped with lanthanide ions (Ln3+). The ink’s downshifting luminescence color is extremely dependent on the excitation wavelength, making the covert tag challenging to read.

Key Highlight:

  • Non-toxic nanomaterial security ink has been produced by Indian scientists that emits light on its own.
  • Counterfeiters commonly utilize covert tags made of luminescent ink.
  • Because fluorides are less stable and poisonous, most security inks on the market now use them.
  • The ink’s downshifting luminescence color is extremely dependent on the excitation wavelength, making the covert tag challenging to read.
  • This ink is used to combat the counterfeiting of branded goods, banknotes, medicines, certificates, and currency worldwide.
  • The researcher produced a luminous security ink based on lanthanide ions (Ln3+) doped Gd1-xBixPO4 nanom material.

Indian Scientist has developed a non-toxic, highly stable security ink made from nanomaterials that spontaneously emit light (luminescence) due to their unique chemical properties, spontaneously emit light (luminescence). This ink is used to combat the counterfeiting of branded goods, banknotes, medicines, certificates, and currency worldwide.

There is a severe problem with counterfeiting of high-value items such as branded goods, cash, and certificates. Counterfeiters commonly utilize hidden tags made of luminescent ink to prevent their goods from being stolen. The majority of today’s security inks are based on luminescent compounds that absorb a high-energy photon and emit a low-energy photon, a process known as downshifting, in which a hidden tag is invisible in daylight but becomes apparent under UV light. These single-emission-based tags, on the other hand, are prone to reproduction because of their simplicity. Excitation-dependent luminous characteristics (downshifting and upconversion) in luminescent ink are recommended to get over this problem. Decoding a tag becomes more difficult as there are more parameters required to be entered. However, the majority of compounds identified recently for this purpose are based on fluorides, which are less stable and highly hazardous.

The Institute of Nano Science and Technology, Mohali, a self-governing institute under the Department of Science and Technology, Government of India, has developed non-toxic metal phosphate-based ink with excitation-dependent luminescent properties that are extremely stable under real-world conditions such as temperature, humidity, and light. There are papers on this in the journals Crystal Growth and Design and the Materials Today Communications series.

The researcher produced a luminous security ink based on lanthanide ions (Ln3+) doped Gd1-xBixPO4 nanomaterials. Luminescence features such as downshifting and upconversion were clearly visible in this material. The ink’s downshifting luminescence color is also strongly dependent on the excitation wavelength, making it challenging to interpret the concealed tag.

To make these luminous nanoparticles, scientists used an easy procedure called co-precipitation. Nanoparticles and widely available PVC gold medium ink were used to form a composite. To print patterns and letters on black paper, the composite ink was applied to the substrate. Diverse wavelengths of stimulation yielded different patterns in the ink, but the designs were stable under a variety of settings.

Professor Boddu says that because of their rich energy levels, trivalent lanthanide ions can show both downshifting (absorb high energy and emit low energy) and upconversion luminous characteristics (absorb low energy, produce high energy, then absorb and emit high energy) capabilities. Excitation-dependent downshifting emission occurs when energy is transferred between bismuth and lanthanide ions.’

Aluminosity downshifting and upconversion of lanthanide ions is well recognized. For anti-counterfeiting purposes, we reasoned that using these materials would enhance the encoding and decoding capabilities, as well as the overall security.”

When it comes to combatting counterfeiting, the newly created ink has enormous promise. This document/authenticity product’s can simply be determined by the average person.

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