Home Education The draft policy of the UGC with its lower ratio raises concerns...

The draft policy of the UGC with its lower ratio raises concerns about job losses

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The draft policy of the UGC with its lower ratio raises concerns about job losses

The University Grants Commission (UGC) wants to cut the teacher-student ratios in some general undergraduate courses and hire more contract teachers for professional programs in a draft policy. People who work in the field say that this could lead to job losses and a big drop in the quality of education.

A draft document from the University Grants Commission (UGC) says that institutions should be encouraged to let up to 50% of their professional teachers be hired on a contract. The document also says that schools should teach a wide range of subjects, including business and social science. It doesn’t say if it will get more money for infrastructure and hostels.

Key Highlight:

  • According to the University Grants Commission’s draft guideline, reduced teacher-student ratios for some general undergraduate courses and more contractual professors for professional programs could result in faculty job losses.
  • It calls for a 1:25 teacher-student ratio in science and a 1:30 for business and management programs. “The draft may be referring to teacher-student ratios in the classroom rather than a stream or institution,” stated A.K.
  • DUTA will advise the UGC not to promote the idea to allow up to 50% contractual professors for professional courses, Bhagi said.
  • The text also urges universities to educate multiple subjects.
  • There are now no rules or guidelines for teacher-student ratios on campus. The overall ratio across all streams is 1:18.
  • The UGC, which is in charge of the quality and funding of higher education, wants to hear from people by February 11.
  • The recommendations are part of a plan the UGC has made for the future of the college.
  • The document says that schools should teach a lot of different things.
  • There is a chance that the draft is talking about teacher-student ratios in the classroom, not a stream or school or something else.
  • While the document encourages institutions to improve their infrastructure, including their hostel facilities, it doesn’t say how much money it will give them.
  • The document encourages schools to improve their infrastructure, including their hostel facilities.

Policy: The University Grants Commission has proposed lower teacher-student ratios in general undergraduate courses and more contract teachers for professional programs. This has raised concerns about job losses for college and university faculties.

This means that even though there aren’t any rules or guidelines about how many teachers and students should be on campus, the overall ratio across all streams is 1:18 right now. When the then UPA government approved new teaching jobs in 2008, it did so in the 1:18 ratio, giving it a kind of official seal. This is how the government made sure that the new jobs were approved.

It also says that higher education institutions should have a teacher-student ratio of 1:30 in the social sciences, 1:25 in the sciences, and 1:30 in the business, management, and vocational programs. See the chart.

The UGC, which is in charge of the quality and funding of higher education, wants to hear from people who work with the industry by February 11.

People who work for teachers’ groups say that even though the UGC could adopt these draft recommendations, they could still encourage universities to cut teacher hiring and eventually remove sanctioned teaching jobs to cut costs.

The Democratic Teachers’ Front is a teachers’ group at Delhi University. “This is going to lead to a lot of teachers losing their jobs and a lot of students not getting a good education.”

As the secretary of the DTF, Abha Dev Habib made sure to say that the government’s policy on institutions of greatness says that they should try to reach a teacher-student ratio of 1:10.

She asked: “Why should there be different criteria for other institutions?”

People who study mass media, engineering, and pharmacy should have 1:15 to 1:10. People who study architecture and design should have 1:10 to 1:10. People who study architecture and design should have 1:10 to 1:10.

The recommendations are part of an Institutional Development Plan that the UGC has made for higher education institutions to follow, taking into account the National Education Policy that the UGC has made.

The draft says that contractual (tenured) or visiting teachers from the profession or industry could make up to 50% of a school’s total faculty. It says this would help bridge the gap between academia and the real world. Between 10 and 20 percent of students at most professional colleges are now students who are not students.

DTF: “This means that a lot of teaching work will still be up for grabs, and many of the jobs that already exist will not be long-term.”

Even so, A.K. Bhagi, the Delhi University Teachers’ Association (DUTA) president, which is the official teachers’ group, thinks the draft may be talking about teacher-student ratios in the classroom, not a stream or stream university.

Since a lecture hall almost always has only one teacher and a lot of students, there aren’t any rules or limits on how many people can attend a class.

As a member of Bhagi’s BJP-backed National Democratic Teachers’ Front (NDTF), he said, “We will write to the UGC to ask for clarification.”

Also, Bhagi said that the DUTA would ask the UGC not to move forward with the idea of allowing up to 50% of professional course teachers to be hired on a short-term basis.

The document also says that schools should teach many different subjects. A school like the Shri Ram College of Commerce, a leader in commerce education, should not be forced to start new programs. This is what Habib said:

To say that the UGC should push all kinds of courses at every school in the name of “multi-disciplinary courses” doesn’t make sense. It’s not good for institutions to be all the same.

Bhagi said that his understanding was that schools would be encouraged to teach more than one language, but there would be no forced education of that language.

As long as the document encourages institutions to improve their infrastructure, including their hostel facilities, it doesn’t say if they’ll get more money from the government.

Habib said that the regulator should explain how the money will be paid for. Bhagi said that not talking about money should not be seen as a denial of money.

Source- Telegraph India

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